Archive for Rice

Balsamic Roasted Winter Squash and Wild Rice Salad

1 cup wild rice
3 1/2 cups water or stock (chicken or vegetable)
Salt to taste
2 pounds kabocha or butternut squash, peeled and cut in small dice (about 3 cups peeled and diced, weighing 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 pounds)
Salt to taste
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (more to taste)
1 garlic clove, minced or puréed
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons walnut oil, or substitute extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped fresh herbs, like parsley, chives, tarragon
1/2 cup diced celery
1 5- or 6-ounce bag baby arugula or spinach

1. Rinse the wild rice. Bring the water or stock to a boil in a medium saucepan, add salt to taste and the rice. Bring back to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer 45 minutes, until the rice is tender and has begun to splay (Make sure to cook the wild rice until it begins to splay or you won’t get the full nutty flavor of the grains). Drain through a strainer, return to the pot and cover the pot with a clean dishtowel. Return the lid to the pot and let sit for 10 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil. Place the squash in a bowl or directly on the baking sheet and toss with salt to taste, the balsamic vinegar and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Spread on the baking sheet in an even layer and make sure to tip all of the liquid remaining in the bowl over the squash. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes so that the squash browns evenly. The squash should be tender all the way through. Remove from the heat.

3. In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the lemon juice, garlic, salt to taste and mustard. Whisk in the remaining olive oil and the walnut oil.

4. Combine the wild rice, squash, herbs and celery in a large bowl. Toss with the dressing. Add salt and pepper to taste. Line a platter, individual plates or a wide salad bowl with the baby spinach or arugula. Top with the salad and serve.

Yield: 6 servings.

Advance preparation: This salad holds well for a couple of days in the refrigerator, without the arugula or spinach.

Nutritional information per serving (6 servings): 268 calories; 14 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 5 grams polyunsaturated fat; 7 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 32 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams dietary fiber; 44 milligrams sodium (does not include salt to taste); 6 grams protein

 

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Brown Rice Risotto With Winter Squash

The meat or fish is totally optional; the chew and flavor are of course welcome, but this could be a fine vegan risotto. And as with any risotto, the leftovers have insane potential. Since a cup of brown rice produces around four cups of cooked rice, with all these substantial add-ins this recipe really serves four people, even as a main course.

The night I made it, there were two of us. The next night, I crisped maybe two ounces of chopped bacon in a little more olive oil, then scooped that out and sautéed a little more onion and a cup of peas (actually, frozen), cranked the heat and browned the leftover rice in there: instant fried rice, and never better.

Which brings me to the Parmesan. I consider it optional largely because I’ve come to prefer leaner, simpler risottos. Traditionally (I suppose), butter was the fat of choice, and Parmesan used whenever it was available and appropriate — that is, a good pairing. In restaurants at least, a big hunk of butter is often stirred in at the end of cooking to enrich the dish and take it over the top. (If you’ve ever wondered why your risotto is not as velvety and filling as that in restaurants, it’s because you have more of a conscience than most chefs.)

But I start with good olive oil and often omit the Parmesan, finishing the dish instead with a lot of chopped herb. The results not only showcase the rice and add-ins, they are also cleaner. If you want an even sharper flavor, you could add a bit of lemon juice at the last second.

TOTAL TIME
About 45 minutes

Salt
1 cup short- or medium-grain brown rice
3 tablespoons olive oil or butter
1 medium onion or large shallot, chopped
Black pepper
About 2 cups winter squash in roughly 3/4-inch cubes
1/2 cup dry white wine or water
About 4 cups any stock (shrimp, chicken, lobster, vegetable, pork) or water
About 1 cup bite-size pieces of meat or shellfish (precooked is O.K.): sausage, pork, lobster, shrimp, chicken, etc.
1/2 cup grated Parmesan, optional
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil or parsley

1.
Bring medium pot of water to a boil and salt it. Stir in brown rice, adjust heat so that water bubbles steadily, and cook without stirring, until rice is swollen and half-tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Drain. (If you want to wait a bit before proceeding, spread the rice on a platter or sheet tray so it cools.)
2.
Put oil in a large, deep skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, add onion or shallot and cook, stirring occasionally, until it softens, 3 to 5 minutes. Add rice and cook, stirring occasionally, until it is glossy and coated with oil, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then stir in the squash; add the wine. Stir and let liquid bubble away.
3.
Begin to add the stock, about ½ cup at a time, stirring after each addition and every minute or so. When the stock is just about evaporated, add more. Keep the heat medium to medium-high and stir frequently.
4.
When rice is just about tender and mixture is creamy, stir in shellfish or meat and continue to cook, adding more liquid if necessary, until rice is tender. The final dish should be quite moist but not soupy. Add Parmesan if you’re using it, then taste and add more salt or pepper (or both) if necessary. Garnish with basil or parsley and serve.

YIELD
4 servings

Originally published with A Different Shade of Risotto

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Coconut Rice

“The floral fragrance and subtle flavor of Thai jasmine rice make it a delightful choice as a side dish. But adding unsweetened Thai coconut milk makes it even more appealing, contributing a bit of creaminess and more perfume to the aroma. This is a long-grain rice that cooks up nice and fluffy, with distinct grains. It does need a longer resting time (20 minutes) than a short-grain rice requires, but that will ensure absolutely perfect rice every time.” — From “Staff Meals from Chanterelle” by David Waltuck and Melicia Phillips.

2 cups Thai jasmine rice or other long-grain rice
1 can (13 or 14 ounces) coconut milk, preferably a Thai brand
3 1/2 cups water

1. Combine the rice, coconut milk, and water in a small, heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to low, cover tightly, and simmer, without removing the cover, until all the liquid is absorbed, 20 minutes.

2. Remove the pan from the heat and let it stand, covered, for 20 minutes more before fluffing and serving. Makes about 7 cups.

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Coconut Rice

This is an incredibly simple way to make white rice into something a little bit exotic & totally delicious. Makes a nice accompaniment to a spicy or strongly flavored entree.

The book says, “The floral fragrance and subtle flavor of Thai jasmine rice make it a delightful choice as a side dish. But adding unsweetened Thai coconut milk makes it even more appealing, contributing a bit of creaminess and more perfume to the aroma. This is a long-grain rice that cooks up nice and fluffy, with distinct grains. It does need a longer resting time (20 minutes) than a short-grain rice requires, but that will ensure absolutely perfect rice every time. Coconut rice is a fine accompaniment to pork saté with spicy peanut sauce, chicken with cashews, or oven-roasted barbecued ribs.”

Makes about 7 cups; Serves 6 to 8

2 cups Thai jasmine rice or other long-grain rice
1 can (13 or 14 ounces) coconut milk, preferably a Thai brand
3 1/2 cups water

1. Combine the rice, coconut milk, and water in a small, heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to low, cover tightly, and simmer, without removing the cover, until all the liquid is absorbed, 20 minutes.

2. Remove the pan from the heat and let it stand, covered, for 20 minutes more before fluffing and serving.

From “Staff Meals from Chanterelle” by David Waltuck and Melicia Phillips.

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Surinamese Mixed Rice (Moksi Alesi)

Way back in 1998 I participated in an international vegan mailing list where a member contributed this recipe. I’m pretty sure that I have never eaten an “authentic” version of Surinamese mixed rice, but even if it isn’t the real thing, I think it is fairly easy, tasty and unusual.

This is her recipe and her explanation. The author’s comments about “forbidden” foods refer to her original version of this dish (she didn’t supply the original recipe), which must have contained non-vegan ingredients.

The original post:
Surinam has a very mixed population and thus a very varied kitchen. In daily life we eat “Surinamese” (=Afro-Surinamese), Indian, Indonesian, Chinese and since one year or so American food (Mc Donald, KFC and PizzaHut) as well…

I adapted a recipe that has its roots in the Afro-Surinamese kitchen, but now is appreciated by all inhabitants. I had to do a lot of adapting, for in the original recipe all what is forbidden in our opionon is used! I cook this recipe as a sundays meal.

The aim is that you make a gravy in which you cook rice, split beans and vegetables. In the end the rice is dry AND tasty. I cook from 1 to 5 on the stove. Then I put sauce and rice in the rice cooker, but perhaps it is for a start easier to finisch the cooking on the stove.

The recipe is not too easy to cook in the beginning. You have to develop the feeling how much gravy you need for your amount of rice. But keep trying, for in the end this recipe will be a favourite, espcially if you have to cook for a party.

1 pound brown rice
1/3 pound yellow split beans
1 1/2 pint of water (or a bit more or a bit less…)
1 big onion, in small pieces
1 tomato
2 spoons of tomato paste
1 hot pepper
1 vegan bouillon cube (optional, but it adds to the “Surinamese” taste)
1 cup cubed pumpkin
1 cup white cabbage, coarse cut
salt (optional)
black pepper (a lot!)

1. Cook the yellow split beans half done. Throw the cook water away.
2. Simmer the onion a few minutes, add the small cut tomatoe and the bouillon cube, simmer about five minutes. Add, if neccesary a bit of water.
3. Add the half cooked split beans and the tomato paste. Add the water. Stir, and simmer another five minutes.
4. Add the pumpkin and cook till pumpkin is half done.
5. Taste the sauce. Add black pepper. The sauce should taste rather strong.
6. Add the drained rice. The sauce level should be a phalanx above the rice. If necessary, add some water. Taste the gravy again! Stir, let the sauce cook, and put cabbage and hot pepper on top, and put the pot on the lowest possible gas. (The pepper gives a special flavour)
7. Simmer for about half an hour. Taste if the rice is nearly done. Sprinkle if necessary a bit of HOT water over the rice and cook another five minutes. Take the hot pepper out of the pot and stir the cabbage carefully – with a fork – through the rice. Put the pepper back.
8. Simmer for another five minutes. The rice should be dry and tasty.
9. Take the pot of the stove, take the lid of the pot and leave the rice five minutes untouched.
10. Cut the hot pepper in very small pieces (with a fork and knife, so that you don’t burn your hands.)
11. Serve with cucumber, onions and tomatoes in vinegar.

Succes and have a good meal.

Myrna Laret
Paramaribo, Surinam

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Winter Squash with Wild Rice Stuffing

This is beautiful and delicious. You can use it as a main dish for vegans and/or a side dish for omnivores.

Winter Squash (such as Hubbard, Butternut, Buttercup, Acorn or Pumpkin)
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock or water (you can use chicken stock for a non-vegetarian version)
2/3 cup wild rice
1 large red onion, chopped
1 large celery rib, diced
2 medium apples, peeled, seeded, and diced
3 cups whole-grain bread crumbs (about 4 slices)
1/3 cup dried cranberries
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/2 cup apple juice
Light vegetable oil cooking spray

First, prepare the squash. Halve the squash lengthwise with a sharp knife and scoop out the seeds and fibers. Place halves, cut side up, in foil-lined shallow baking dishes and cover tightly with more foil. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes in a 375 degree oven, or until easily pierced with a knife but still firm. When cool enough to handle, scoop out some of the pulp, leaving a sturdy, 1/2-inch thick shell all around. Save the pulp for another use (the cooked pulp freezes well).

In a small saucepan, bring the stock or water to a simmer. Stir in the wild rice, cover, and simmer gently until the liquid is absorbed, 45 to 55 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Spray a medium skillet with the vegetable oil cooking spray; sauté the onion and celery over medium heat until golden.

In a large bowl, combine the cooked wild rice, onion-celery mixture, apples, bread crumbs, dried cranberries, thyme, salt, and pepper. Stir well to combine. Drizzle apple juice in slowly, stirring all the while, until the mixture is evenly moistened. Stuff into the prepared squash. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the top is slightly crispy. Makes 8 cups.

Adapted from Nava Atlas’ recipe in Veggie Life magazine, November 1997.

Note: The original recipe contained canola oil and walnuts. In this version, I substituted the vegetable oil cooking spray for the canola oil, and the walnuts were eliminated to suit the dietary needs of someone on an extremely low fat diet.

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Rizogalo

“This is Greek-style comfort food that I learned to make in Athens. The egg thickens the pudding, but if you just dump raw egg into hot rice, it will turn into scrambled eggs. Take the time to mix it in bit by bit — this is the best rice pudding.”

8 cups milk
1 cup raw long-grain white rice
1 ½ cups sugar
Rind from one lemon
1 whole egg or 2 egg yolks (optional)

Heat the milk in a heavy bottomed pan. Wash the rice, drain off excess water, and add to the hot milk. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer uncovered for ½ hour, stirring occasionally. Add the sugar and lemon rind and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, for another 10 minutes, until the mixture is just thick enough to coat a spoon.

Beat the egg in a medium-sized bowl and stir in a few spoonfuls of the hot rice mixture. Add a bit more hot rice and stir again. Repeat a few times until the mixture is well-diluted and the egg is heated. Pour the egg-rice mixture into the pot, stir well and simmer for a couple of minutes. Pour into serving dishes and sprinkle with cinnamon. Cool before serving (if you can wait that long).

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